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What’s Next in Police State America? Wearable Alcohol Biosensors, Of Course!

Scientists will compete to create an improved wearable alcohol biosensor contest sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAA) or really the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

FYI, the NIAA is a component of the NIH.

If you guessed Homeland Security is behind this, give yourself a gold star. Click here & here to read more. Don’t forget wherever DHS goes Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is sure to follow. MADD has a close relationship with Homeland Security, click herehere to read more.

When there’s money to be made you can bet private companies are working with DHS to turn a quick profit! New alcohol sensing (spying) bracelets like ‘Vive‘ are being marketed as safety devices and also to prevent sexual abuse.

If you also guessed Microsoft is behind this, give yourself another gold star! Click here to read more.

“Vive is a smart wearable concept with integrated sensors that monitor the wearer’s biometrics related to alcohol consumption and keeps them synced up to their designated party group, so friends know if something’s wrong. It is designed to be desirable to young people, while keeping them safe and connected as they party. Vive amplifies existing social networks, making sure individuals don’t get separated from their group. When things get out of control, Vive makes sure a user is not alone.”

Another company profiting from wearable alcohol wrist bracelets calls it a ‘WriSTAS.’  Pronounced Wrist Ass? Because you’d have to be an ASS to let big brother monitor your alcohol intake and location.

“Alcohol abuse continues to be a serious problem for health and public safety. Approximately 14,000 lives are lost annually in alcohol-involved vehicle crashes.

Giner, Inc. has developed a transdermal alcohol sensor for measuring human alcohol consumption. The advanced wrist-worn prototype has been tested at several clinical sites in controlled clinical studies and field studies on over 250 research subjects. These WrisTAS™ (Wrist Transdermal Alcohol Sensor) prototypes are available for research studies where it is important to objectively track patterns of drinking.”

The reality is far different than for-profit corporations would have you believe. Recent DHS/NHTSA studies claim drunk driving is decreasing. Click here to read more.

Interestingly, no mention is made on how police and the government would use the information saved on these devices to prosecute you.

The NIAA issued the Wearable Alcohol Biosensor Challenge earlier this month.

The contest goal is to create a device that will deliver accurate, real-time data to measure how much someone has been drinking. The data would benefit researchers, clinicians and therapists, as well as individuals.

The study would “prevent children and adolescents from beginning and continuing to drink alcohol.”

What’s next another ‘Prohibition‘? We all now how that turned out, right?

Presently, an alcohol biosensor bracelet can only take a reading every 30 minutes. The NIH calls the current model “effective but cumbersome.”

The winning design could take the form of jewelry or clothing, and it should be inconspicuous. In addition to measuring a person’s alcohol level, the device should store the data or transmit it to a smartphone. ” Yeah, because that makes perfect sense! Lets let our smartphone record every drink you’ve consumed so the police will have a handy way to prosecute you!

“This project is designed to stimulate investment from public and private sectors in the development of improved alcohol biosensors that will be appealing to researchers, treatment providers and individuals,” said NIAAA director George F. Koob, Ph.D. It’s all about the money!

According to NIH, a well-calibrated alcohol biosensor is more accurate than self-reporting and eliminates the need for multiple blood draws.

The contest deadline is Dec. 1, with judging to begin in January 2016. Contestant must submit a prototype, photos, videos and data proving the device’s functionality and accuracy.

The winners will be announced on or after Feb. 15, 2016. First prize is $200,000, and second prize is $100,000.

To enter the Wearable Alcohol Biosensor Challenge, click here.

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What’s Next in Police State America? Wearable Alcohol Biosensors, Of Course!

 

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